Tuesday, February 25, 2020

New Zealand: Petition to get horses on Hauraki Rail Trail receives wide reaching support

Stuff.co.nz - Full Article

Sharnae Hope
15:39, Feb 24 2020

A petition to have horses on the Hauraki Rail Trail has now amassed more than 700 signatures.

Its creator, Te Aroha West local Leanne Richardson said receiving an "overwhelming" amount of supporters speaks volumes.

"We are well and truly over 700 and it just keeps on climbing. They [the signatures] are from everywhere and everyone's supporting it," Richardson said.

Launched in December 2019, the petition is for horse riders to have access to the Hauraki Rail Trail as well as cyclists and walkers...

Read more here:
https://www.stuff.co.nz/waikato-times/news/119130273/petition-to-get-horses-on-hauraki-rail-trail-receives-wide-reaching-support

Sunday, February 23, 2020

Free Webinar: Equestrian Trail Design and Best Practices

AmericanTrails.org

From Backcountry to Urban Edge Settings

Best practices for trail design planning, construction, and management in undeveloped natural areas and connecting to urban edge settings.

Presented by:

Matthew Woodson, President and Founder, Okanogan Trail Construction
Justin Azevedo, Director of Landscape Architecture & Planning, Coffman Studio
Holley Groshek, Executive Director, Equine Land Conservation Resource
Randy Rasmussen, Director of Public Lands and Recreation, Back Country Horsemen of America

Event Details
April 16, 2020

10:00 AM to 11:30 AM (Pacific Time) {more time zones}

Cost:

FREE for members
FREE for nonmembers

(learning credits are a $15 fee)

To register for this live event, see
https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/6629382618476136972

Friday, February 21, 2020

Florida: Experience Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge by horseback

Sun-Sentinel.com - full article

By CINDY KENT
SOUTH FLORIDA SUN SENTINEL |
FEB 19, 2020

For the first time, you can experience the landscape of the Florida Everglades at the Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge on horseback.

Since Feb 12, approximately 36 miles of trails have opened to riders who will share multi-use trails with hikers, bicyclists, pet walkers, and vehicles.

No horses will be available to rent.

Authorities suggest a visit to the Boynton Beach refuge before you bring your horse...

Read more here:
https://www.sun-sentinel.com/local/palm-beach/boynton-beach/fl-ne-loxahatchee-refuge-trails-horseback-riders-20200220-csmk4llws5fd3dfvhkjhgcenqi-story.html

Immediate Action Needed by All Trail Enthusiasts!

AmericanTrails.org

Contact your U.S. representative now to support the Recreational Trails Program. H.R. 5797 will dramatically improve the RTP; co-sponsors urgently needed

The Coalition for Recreational Trails (CRT) calls on all trail organizations and trail enthusiasts to take action immediately to continue and to expand the Recreational Trails Program (RTP), the national trails assistance program that aids all trail activities nationwide through use of federal non-highway recreational fuel taxes.

by American Trails Staff

The Coalition for Recreational Trails (CRT) calls on all trail organizations and trail enthusiasts to take action immediately to continue and to expand the Recreational Trails Program (RTP), the national trails assistance program that aids all trail activities nationwide through use of federal non-highway recreational fuel taxes.

A huge step occurred late last year when the Congress instructed the U.S. Department of Transportation to develop a timely estimate of the fuel tax generated through non-highway recreational activities in its FY2020 budget and included RTP reauthorization in key Senate legislation creating the next-gen surface transportation program. Now, action in the House of Representatives is underway and underscores the bipartisan and coast-to- coast support RTP enjoys in the Congress.

US Representatives Peter Welch (D-VT), John Curtis (R-UT), Angie Craig (D-MN), Annie Kuster (D-NH), Mike Simpson (R-ID) and Chris Stewart (R- UT) introduced the Recreational Trails Full Funding Act of 2020 (HR 5797) that will more than double funding for the RTP and make other important changes. HR 5797 will:

● require completion of the nonhighway recreational fuel use study at least every five years and reports to Congress on the results;
● increase RTP funding to $250 million annually – from $84 million currently – or to the new estimated amount from the mandated studies;

● establish new reporting standards for projects completed with RTP funds to provide increased transparency;
● simplify and increase funding of administration of RTP by FHWA; and
● re-establish the original formula for apportionment of RTP funds to the states.

Since 1991, RTP has provided funding to states to develop and maintain outdoor recreational trails, allowing millions of Americans and their families to enjoy activities such as hiking, bicycling, cross-country skiing, snowmobiling and 4-wheel driving. More than 25,000 key projects have been completed in all states and the District of Columbia and benefit not only the recreational trail enthusiasts paying the taxes but all trail activities.

The successes of RTP are easier to understand than ever through CRT’s new website at www.rectrails.org which includes a copy of HR 5797, new infographics explaining the RTP program and links to key data, including information about completed projects in each state.

CRT’s Board of Directors now asks each trail enthusiast organization, recreation industry association and trail advocates to take these actions now:

Use your print and electronic communications channels to share news of HR 5797 and other recent Congressional actions which would continue and expand the RTP, providing safe and healthy trail opportunities for all Americans. Send copies of your stories to CRT at CRTLeadership@rectrails.org.

Retweet the great tweet by US Representatives Welch and Curtis at https://twitter.com/PeterWelch...

Write to express thanks to HR 5797’s cosponsors for being RTP Champions:

The Hon. Peter Welch The Hon. John Curtis The Hon. Angie Craig The Hon. Annie Kuster The Hon. Mike Simpson The Hon. Chris Stewart

See the attached CRT letter, with its impressive list of supporting national organizations.

Use this address: The Hon. xxx, U.S. House of Representatives, Washington, DC 20515

Contact your own U.S. Representative and those Members with strong relations to your organization and ask them to cosponsor HR 5797, the Recreational Trails Full Funding Act. Ask your Senators to support the similar Senate bill, S. 1527. Interested Members in the House should contact Alex Piper (Welch) at Alex.Piper@mail.house.gov or Jake Bornstein (Curtis) at Jake.Bornstein@mail.house.gov.

Check the CRT website at least weekly for updates: www.rectrails.org.

Example Letter

United States House of Representatives
Washington, DC 20515

Dear Representatives:
The nation’s recreational trails community strongly supports HR 5797, strengthening and extending the Recreational Trails Program (RTP). We deeply appreciate your national leadership efforts on this important issue. This legislation would ensure that the remarkable successes of the RTP since its 1991 creation will continue and provide safe, enjoyable trails and access to the Great Outdoors for millions of Americans. The measure requires a Nonhighway Recreational Fuel Study, better reporting of RTP projects and increased funding.

RTP is a partner-based program uniting federal/state/local agencies, enthusiasts and the recreation industry and is unique in its support of trail maintenance. More than 25,000 projects and programs have been completed, contributing to our economy, to our health and safety, and to greater access to our public lands.
Co-signed organizations:

Adventure Cycling Association
American Council of Snowmobile Associations
American Hiking Society
American Horse Council
American Motorcyclist Association
American Trails
Americans for Responsible Recreational Access
Back Country Horsemen of America
Bikes Belong
BlueRibbon Coalition
Conservation Legacy
The Corps Network
Equine Land Conservation Resource
International Association of Snowmobile Administrators
International Mountain Bicycling Association
International Snowmobile Manufacturers Association
Motorcycle Industry Council
National Association of State Park Directors
National Association of State Trail Administrators
National Park Hospitality Association
National Off-Highway Vehicle Conservation Council
National Recreation and Park Association
National Wildlife Federation
Off-Road Business Association
Outdoor Recreation Roundtable
People for Bikes
Professional Trail Builders Association
Rails-to-Trails Conservancy
Recreation Vehicle Dealers Association
Recreational Off-Highway Vehicle Association
SnowSports Industries America
Society of Outdoor Recreation Professionals
Specialty Equipment Market Association
Specialty Vehicle Institute of America
Sports and Fitness Association
The Student Conservation Association
Tread Lightly!
United Four Wheel Drive Associations

More info at:
https://www.americantrails.org/resources/immediate-action-needed-by-all-trail-enthusiasts

Wednesday, February 19, 2020

FREE THURSDAY WEBINAR: Solutions for Managing Conflict on Shared-Use Trails

AmericanTrails.org

This webinar is free to the public, thanks to a generous sponsorship from New York State Office of Parks, Recreation, and Historic Preservation, the Recreational Trails Program (RTP), and the Federal Highway Administration.

Continuing the conversation from the 2019 International Trails Symposium (ITS) and Training Institute and our TRAILSLead™ Multi-use Trails and Conflict Forum, this webinar will build upon the concepts brought up during the panel discussion (these concepts are outlined in a synopsis article post ITS 2019).

Presented by:
- Danielle Fowles-McNiven, Interim Executive Director, Tread Lightly!, Inc.
- Chelle Grald, Trails & Rides Manager, AERC Trailmaster & Vermont Trails Advocate, Green Mountain Horse Association
- Steve Salisbury, Government Affairs Manager, American Motorcyclist Association
- Cam Lockwood, Owner, Trails Unlimited
- Matt Nelson, Executive Director, Arizona Trail Association
- Rich Edwards, Director of Construction and Operations - Trail Solutions, International Mountain Bicycling Association
- Karen Umphress (Moderator), Owner, UP! Outside

For more information and to register, see:
https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/9221948571892697613

North Carolina: New Preserve Will Feature Hiking, Horseback Riding Trails

SpectrumLocalNews.com - Full Article

By Spectrum News Staff Wake County
PUBLISHED 6:53 PM ET Feb. 18, 2020

WAKE COUNTY, N.C. — A new 571-acre preserve will primarily serve as an equestrian and hiking trail facility, the Wake County Board of Commissioners announced Tuesday.

The board approved a $2 million construction contract with McQueen Contruction of Bahama, N.C. to build Procter Farm Preserve located between Doc Proctor and Riley Hill Roads. The property is currently a mix of forest and working farmland near Knightdale, Wendell, and Zebulon.

“Procter Farm Preserve will provide another option in Wake County for people to enjoy horseback riding and other recreational pursuits...”

Read more here:
https://spectrumlocalnews.com/nc/triangle-sandhills/news/2020/02/18/new-preserve-will-feature-hiking--horseback-riding-trails?utm_medium=40digest.7days3.20200219.home&utm_source=email&utm_content=&utm_campaign=campaign

Wednesday, February 12, 2020

Idaho lawmakers killed a bill on public land access last week. Now they’ve resurrected it

IdahoStatesman.com - Full Article

By Nicole Blanchard
February 10, 2020

For the second time in a week, Idaho lawmakers considered introducing legislation that aimed to improve access to public land. For the first time, they voted to move it forward.

The Senate Resources and Environment Committee on Monday voted to print a bill that would mean fines for people who knowingly block public land access.

Sen. Fred Martin, R-Boise, sponsored the legislation Monday. Last Wednesday, the House Resources and Conservation committee swiftly voted down printing a comparable bill, which was sponsored by Rep. John Gannon, D-Boise.

Martin told the Senate committee that public land is an incredibly popular issue...

Read more here: https://www.idahostatesman.com/news/politics-government/state-politics/article240156883.html?utm_source=1500+CWP+List+Daily+Clips+and+Updates&utm_campaign=f8d03192ad-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2020_02_11_04_01&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_4369a4e737-f8d03192ad-84222569#storylink=cpy

Thursday, February 6, 2020

Free Webinar: Solutions for Managing Conflict on Shared-Use Trails

Americantrails.org

Thursday, February 20, 2020
Time: 10:00am-11:30am Pacific (1:00pm-2:30pm Eastern)

Webinar Details
Continuing the conversation from the 2019 International Trails Symposium (ITS) and Training Institute and our TRAILSLead™ Multi-use Trails and Conflict Forum, this webinar will build upon the concepts brought up during the panel discussion. Attending this webinar would will be valuable to those who did and did not attend ITS and this particular forum. This webinar will include a panel of leaders in the outdoor industry from a variety of trail types, and will be moderated by Karen Umphress with UP! Outside.

Learn more about the webinar, learning objectives, and presenters here.

Webinar Presenters

Danielle Fowles-McNiven, Interim Executive Director, Tread Lightly!, Inc.
Chelle Grald, Trails & Rides Manager, AERC Trailmaster & Vermont Trails Advocate, Green Mountain Horse Association
Steve Salisbury, Government Affairs Manager, American Motorcyclist Association
Cam Lockwood, Owner, Trails Unlimited LLC
Matt Nelson, Executive Director, Arizona Trail Association
Rich Edwards, Director of Construction and Operations - Trail Solutions, International Mountain Bicycling Association
Karen Umphress, Owner, Up! Outside


Webinar Questions
Feel free to send your questions to the presenters (trailhead@americantrails.org) prior to the webinar as we have saved time for questions and answers (Q&A) at the end.

To register, and for more information see:
https://www.americantrails.org/training/solutions-for-managing-conflict-on-shared-use-trails

Sunday, January 26, 2020

Washington: Being responsible trail users

PeninsulaDailyNews.com - Full Article

By Karen Griffiths
Sunday, January 26, 2020

CALLING ALL TRAIL users! Did you know that horses have right of way on all trails? This information is posted on trail literature and websites. So what does that mean to you, the hiker, walker, or bicyclist using the trails?

Does that mean you can ignore the horses and just speed past them as fast as you can? Does that mean you stop, wave your arms and scream? How about attaching a bell to your bicycle and ringing it when you see a horse approaching?

Answers: No, no and partially true.

If you are riding a bike then a bell is a good idea to ring as a warning, especially when you can’t see around the bend. The correct response, however, is to move off to the side of the trail, stop and wait patiently for the animals to pass by.

Linda Morin, a member of Back Country Horseman’s Peninsula Chapter, asks folks to abide by the three S’s: Stop, Stand and Speak. Stop your forward movement, stand to the side of the trail and calmly speak a greeting...

Read more here:
https://www.peninsuladailynews.com/life/horseplay-being-responsible-trail-users/

Wednesday, January 15, 2020

This Is Why Mountain Bikers Can’t Have Nice Things

Outsideonline.com - Full Article

Bad behavior might be jeopardizing access to Kingdom Trails, one of the premier networks on the East Coast. Here’s what we can learn from it.

Eben Weiss
Jan 13, 2020

ome years back I visited Gothenburg, Sweden, and my host took me to ride some trails in a park just a short pedal from the city center. “Is this even legal?” I asked incredulously, imagining how much trouble I’d be in were I to steer my bicycle off the pavement in Central Park, even briefly. He then explained to me the Swedish concept of freedom to roam, or allemansr├Ątten—literally “the everyman’s rights”—by which the constitution entitles people to walk, cycle, ski, and camp on most open land, regardless of whether it’s public or private.

It doesn’t work that way here in America, where mountain bike access to parkland is tightly regulated, and where public access of any kind to private land is entirely at the landowner’s discretion. One outstanding example of landowner largesse is Kingdom Trails in northeastern Vermont, which features over 100 miles of non-motorized trails “for all seasons and abilities,” and is spread across the properties of 97 private landowners, all of whom generously allow the public access to their land for a variety of uses, including mountain biking. Run by the non-profit Kingdom Trails Association (KTA), it’s become one of the premier recreational trail networks in the Northeast. A $15 one-day membership fee (or $75 annually) nets you access to a famously well-groomed and signed system that attracts over 100,000 visitors a year, 84 percent of whom come from out of state, and all of whom bring tourism dollars. Over the past 20 years, the trails have transformed the town of East Burke, which once attracted mostly skiers and leaf-peepers, and turned what was once the off-season into the peak season.

This past December, however, three landowners on Darling Hill informed KTA that they would no longer allow mountain bikers to use their property. “While the success of the trails has brought meaningful economic benefit to the area,” stated KTA on its website, “challenges and tension points exist around traffic, congestion and pedestrian safety of residents and visitors alike.” The landowners will continue to allow Nordic skiers, snowshoers, runners, hikers and horseback riders to access their property...

Read more here:
https://www.outsideonline.com/2407740/mountain-biker-behavior-trail-access