Wednesday, September 19, 2018

Why You Don't Want the States Managing Public Land

Outsideonline.com - Full Article

The GOP doesn't think the feds should oversee our national heritage. Here's why they're wrong.

Wes Siler
Nov 2, 2017

States should manage the public lands within their own borders, right? It sounds like one of those common sense, local management, small government things that will be in the citizens’ best interests.

It’s actually exactly the opposite.

That's because the federal government is mandated to manage public lands for multiple uses. So for-profit enterprises, like logging and drilling, need to co-exist with folks who want to hike, bike, and play on those lands, as well as the wildlife that already lives there. In contrast, states are mandated to manage their lands for profit, which means logging and drilling take precedent over public access and environmental concerns.

The difference really is that simple, and it's really all you need to know to understand why federal management is better for our wild places than state management. But the ramifications of that difference are incredibly far reaching...

Read more here:
https://www.outsideonline.com/2256531/why-you-dont-want-states-managing-public-land

Monday, September 17, 2018

Keeping Paradise Possible

Trailmeister.com - Full Article

February 20, 2017
by Robert Eversole

Keeping Paradise Possible – By Robert Eversole – North East Chapter, BCHW

Paradise. For some that’s an image of a tropical beach, for me it’s a dirt trail that twists and meanders to a backcountry camp deep in the wilderness. It’s a quiet solitude punctuated by the peaceful clip clop of hooves and the far scream of an eagle aloft. It’s the sweet perfume of pine on a warm summer day. It’s the
companionship of a trusted horse who will faithfully take you home.

Unfortunately, in a growing number of cases paradise has padlocks.

In only a few short generations we’ve “improved” a lot of backcountry and rural areas into suburbia and shopping malls. Trail Closed signs are both dreaded and unfortunately frequently encountered. Least we lose them, we’d better take care of the equine friendly country that remains. Paradise needs protecting.

You don’t have to be a trail rider, or even have your own horse, to recognize the importance of conserving horse trails. There are many things that each of us can do to preserve equine trails. Unfortunately, often it’s sometimes hard to explain why groups like ours are important. Here are some of the reasons to join that I talk about during my expo clinics.

Horse clubs are focal points for both social events and trail stewardship efforts. For me the biggest reason to join an equestrian club is for the comradery of people who have the same interests. Being able to talk about trail conditions, feed, training, etc. is priceless.

Don’t have a local Back Country Horsemen group nearby, or don’t care for the one that is? Start a new one. These organizations are always looking for new members and new chapters. A quick google search will put you in touch with someone who can help.

Here are four reasons to join a, or start, a horse club. And quotes from those who have...

Read more here:
https://www.trailmeister.com/keeping-paradise-possible/

Friday, September 14, 2018

Monica Chapman, AERC Trails Advocate, Interviewed on Equestrian Legacy Radio

BlogTalkRadio.com - Listen

Monica Chapman, AERC Vice President and Co-Chair of Trails and Land Management Committee, interviewed on Equestrian Legacy Radio

September 4 2018

THURSDAY SEPT 4th 3 pm on Equestrian Legacy Radio's SADDLE UP AMERICA!
Jim McGarvey with Backcountry Horsemen of America and the American Endurance Ride Conference's Vice President, Monica Chapman are our special guest on this issue of SADDLE UP AMERICA!

Listen Live or to the Archived Podcast at www.equestrianlegacy.net


Tuesday, September 4, 2018

Conservationists say LWCF key to unlocking inaccessible public lands

PostRegister.com - Full Article

By MICHAEL WRIGHT Bozeman Daily Chronicle
Aug 28, 2018

BOZEMAN, Mont. — There are millions of acres of landlocked public land in the western U.S., and conservation advocates say a soon-to-expire conservation fund is vital to unlocking access to them.

A new report produced by the Theodore Roosevelt Conservation Partnership and onX Maps says a total of 9.52 million acres of federal public land across 13 western states are surrounded by private lands and inaccessible to the public. In Montana, an estimated 1.52 million public acres are unreachable, a total surpassed in the report only by Wyoming and Nevada.

Joel Webster, Western lands director for TRCP, said any hope of gaining public access to some of those lands relies on the Land and Water Conservation Fund, a pot of federal money set to expire on Sept. 30.

“This is the tool to address this issue,” Webster said. “If this program is not reauthorized, we’ve got a problem without a solution...”

Read more here:
https://www.postregister.com/news/local/conservationists-say-lwcf-key-to-unlocking-inaccessible-public-lands/article_b24f4251-978b-51a5-9484-34a685a8ad99.html

Thursday, August 30, 2018

LA Developer Loses in Equestrian Face-Off

CommercialObserver.com - Full Article

BY ALISON STATEMAN AUGUST 27, 2018 12:51 PM

It seemed at first like a painfully mismatched fight: A showdown between a local developer and the horse-loving communities of Glendale and Burbank, Calif.

The conflict in the Glendale Riverside Rancho district of Los Angeles was ignited this February when Art Simonian, the founder of Metro Investments, and Thomas Bell, the owner of Silver Spur Stables located at 1900 West Riverside Drive, filed an application with the City of Glendale to change the stables’ zoning from commercial equestrian to multifamily residential. They didn’t know what they were getting into.

Simonian and Bell were hoping to demolish the stables, currently housing 80 horses, to make way for 21 townhouses in six three-story buildings on the one-acre parcel on which the stable, built in the 1930s, sits. It would also call for the removal of a 30-feet width of Allen Avenue, an access route to the trail system and Griffith Park. The two hoped to have the project completed by August 2019. Both Simonian and Bell declined to comment on their plans.

The move became the opening volley, which would be met by stringent opposition from Glendale and Burbank residents who feared the change would threaten the area’s equine heritage and historic character, and remove valuable open space providing riders with reasonable access to Griffith Park and local bridle trails. It would also, in their opinion, put a low-density single-family zone at risk for future zone changes and decimate equestrian businesses serving horse owners and working stables...

Read more here:
https://commercialobserver.com/2018/08/la-developer-loses-in-equestrian-face-off/

Sunday, August 26, 2018

New Mexico: Horse Owners Share Thoughts On Los Alamos' Bike Flow Trail

LADailyPost.com - Full Article

By KIRSTEN LASKEY
Los Alamos Daily Post
kirsten@ladailypost.com

As community input on the Los Alamos County’s bike flow trail project is collected, members of the equestrian community hope their perspectivehot on the project is considered.

A few local horseback riders recently spoke with the Los Alamos Daily Post about the bike flow trail and shared their thoughts on the primary proposed location for the trail, Bayo Canyon.

As Nancy Boudrie said, the hope is County staff will look to other locations rather than the canyon for the trail.

“We would like to see them (the County) seek an alternative to the route through Bayo Canyon,” she said.

Pajarito Mountain was the original site proposed for the flow trail, Amy Rogers said. An alternate location was sought due to the lengthy private land transfer process between the ski club and Mountain Capital Partners, LLC. Pajarito Mountain may or may not present the possibility for an alternate location due to the private ownership of the ski hill and the necessary process for using County funds to build a flow trail in this area. However, Pueblo Canyon or other existing County locations may present workable alternative sites.

One issue horse owners have with having the bike flow trail in Bayo Canyon is that it would limit horseback riders’ access to trails in the canyon, June Wall said.

“Bayo Canyon is the only access we have off the stable area … that’s a big concern,” Wall said.

In a written statement, Louis Schulte explained, “Bayo Canyon is particularly important to the horse community as it provides the only access for equestrians to all backcountry trails...

Read more here:
https://www.ladailypost.com/content/horse-owners-share-thoughts-bike-flow-trail

Friday, August 24, 2018

Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF) Set To Expire September 30


LWCFCoalition.com - Learn more


The amount of taxpayer money spent to provide public access to hunting and fishing grounds through the LWCF: $0

The Land and Water Conservation Fund is America's most important program to conserve irreplaceable lands and improve outdoor recreation opportunities throughout the nation.

America's most important conservation and recreation program, which has saved places in nearly every state and every county in the U.S., will expire on September 30, 2018 without action from Congress.

The Land and Water Conservation Fund is in its 52nd year of conservation and recreation success. It is because of Teddy Roosevelt's vision to start protecting our recreational opportunities, Dwight D. Eisenhower’s instinct for conservation action, John F. Kennedy's commitment to the outdoors, and Lyndon B. Johnson's creation of LWCF that we as Americans now have the most extensive network of open spaces in the world to hunt, fish, hike, swim, and play.

But that could be all over in just 52 weeks. In order to build momentum towards finding a long-term solution for authorization and funding, the LWCF Coalition is launching a year-long awareness initiative counting down to the expiration of our most important conservation and recreation program.

Each week a state or U.S. territory will be highlighted showcasing LWCF success stories from the federal, state, and local level, and opportunities that are on the horizon for LWCF to improve recreational access and conservation across America, and places that could be lost forever if Congress does not act by September 30, 2018.
#SaveLWCF before the places we love are lost forever

Learn more and take action here:
https://www.lwcfcoalition.com/