Friday, July 10, 2020

Trails for tomorrow

EquusMagazine.com - Full Article

Now more than ever, your help is needed to maintain and preserve the open land and trails that are the backbone of the horse industry.

ALANA HARRISONJUL 8, 2020

For nearly a decade, Elise Backinger explored the trails of Salida, Colorado, aboard her Quarter Horse gelding, Pep. Salida calls itself the “Gem of the Rockies,” and Backinger’s memories of her rides there are tinged with awe. “There is something deeply profound about the solitude and tranquility you experience riding out in nature. It’s just you, your horse and the land,” she says.

Backinger and her husband have since sold their hay farm and Pep is now a semi-retired therapy horse, but the horsewoman remains grateful for the bond she and her gelding developed on the trail. Their outings, she says, “taught both of us valuable lessons---from encountering unexpected wildlife to negotiating rough terrain to building confidence and endurance.” To ensure that future generations will have the same opportunity to enjoy nature with their horses, Backinger volunteers for the Central Colorado Conservancy, giving presentations on local trails and wildlife areas...

Read more here:
https://equusmagazine.com/riding/trails-for-tomorrow

Tuesday, July 7, 2020

Webinar: Successful Models in Developing and Maintaining Private Equestrian Trail Systems

ELCR.org

July 30 @ 10:00 am - 11:30 am Free

Equine Land Conservation Resource and American Trails will partner to provide a free webinar on July 30 at 10 am Pacific Time (1 pm Eastern Time) entitled Successful Models in Developing and Maintaining Private Equestrian Trail Systems. The webinar will spotlight how three different communities have developed and maintained successful equestrian trail system on private land.

Privately owned land is the most at-risk component of our equestrian landscape. Boarding barns, competition venues, trails, hunt fixtures and hayfields are being lost every day as a result of development, misunderstanding of liability issues by new owners of land, and rising demand for land around urbanizing areas. Access to private land for equestrian use can be a valuable asset in your community and can result in not only a viable recreational trail system but even a corridor providing equine access to public land.

For more information and to register for the webinar go to:
https://www.americantrails.org/training/successful-models-in-developing-and-maintaining-private-equestrian-trail-systems

Tuesday, June 30, 2020

E-Bikes in National Parks: They’re Riding a Slippery Slope

SierraClub.org - Full Article

Do they just damage trails, disturb wildlife, and endanger hikers?

BY CHRISTOPHER KETCHAM | JUN 29 2020

After you’ve labored to summit a hill on a human-powered bicycle, there’s an ineffable joy in riding the force of gravity down the other side, free and easy. Electric bikes offer a wholly different experience, as e-bikes are typically fossil-fuel-powered machines. (Although they can also be powered by renewable energy.) There is no work required to climb the hill; a battery pack charged by a coal-burning power plant or a natural gas facility does the work for you. That battery-powered motor allows you to race at speeds of up to 20 miles per hour, simply by getting on the e-bike.

E-bikes are all the rage in Donald Trump’s Department of the Interior. Last summer, Interior Secretary David Bernhardt issued a directive to national parks that “simplifies and unifies regulation” of the machines by asking “whether e-bikes should be treated [as] motor vehicles.”

Bernhardt’s answer? No, they aren’t motor vehicles. Therefore, all is well with more e-bikes in the parks. “Use of e-bikes will increase access to recreational opportunities,” states the National Park Service on its website. E-bikers will now be able to access “park roads, paved or hardened trails, areas designated for off-road motor vehicle use, and administrative roads where traditional bikes are allowed.”

No problem, right?...

Read more here:
https://www.sierraclub.org/sierra/e-bikes-national-parks-they-re-riding-slippery-slope

Friday, June 26, 2020

Get Off Your High Horse About Poop

SignalSCV.com - Full Article

JUNE 25, 2020
Judy Reinsma

This is regarding the letter in the June 21 edition of the Sunday Signal about horse poop on the San Francisquito Canyon trail.

The dirt path next to the asphalt walking, jogging, biking trail is a BRIDLE TRAIL. A bridle trail is specifically there for HORSES, not for unmounted humans.

Horses poop. Horse poop does not stink, does not contain any harmful germs and actually improves the soil as it dries out and is incorporated into the surrounding natural area.

Getting off one’s horse and scooping up a pile of horse poop, and then putting it into a grocery bag (it’s that large) isn’t easy. One would also have to carry a rake or shovel on horseback and that’s not possible.

So yes, it is too much to ask horse owners to use horse diapers or clean up like dog owners are required to do.

That’s one reason why there are bridle trails, so horseback riders are not riding their horses on the asphalt trails where people and bikes want to go...

Read more here:
https://signalscv.com/2020/06/judy-reinsma-get-off-your-high-horse-about-poop/

Thursday, June 25, 2020

New Mexico: Conflicts on Talpa Traverse Trail turn dangerous

TaosNewscom - Full Article

Tacks found on Talpa Traverse trail recently present a hazard to mountain bikers, horseback riders and hikers.

Posted Tuesday, June 23, 2020 10:40 am
By Cindy Brown
For Taos News

A rise in people out on the trails this summer can lead to more conflicts between trail users such as hikers, mountain bikers, runners and horseback riders. On at least one trail near Taos, the rise in conflicts recently took a dangerous turn.

In mid-May, 50-75 small tacks with sharp needle points possibly upholstery tacks were found on the Talpa Traverse Trail about half a mile from its intersection with Ojitos Trail in Taos Canyon. The tacks were carefully laid in the dirt in a horizontal line across the entire trail at the bottom of a set of rock stairs which is at a blind corner on the trail. Just last week, a series of approximately 11 obstacles constructed of stones and sticks were discovered on the trail by horseback rider Karen Soomekh.

The Talpa Traverse also known as the Talpa Foothills Trail is an unofficial trail across Carson National Forest land. It was built by horseback riders and others, creating an access from the Weimer Foothills area to the forest across an easement given 30 years ago for a bridle path. Today it is a favorite particularly among mountain bike riders and equestrians for its views, rolling terrain, and proximity to town...

Read more here:
https://www.taosnews.com/stories/conflicts-talpa-traverse-trail-dangerous,64478

Monday, June 22, 2020

Senate passes major lands conservation bill

TheHill.com - Full Article

By Rachel Frazin - 06/17/20 12:26 PM EDT

The Senate passed a major public lands bill on Wednesday, voting to set aside hundreds of millions of dollars each year for conservation efforts.

The Great American Outdoors Act, which passed in a 73-25 vote, would permanently provide $900 million in oil and gas revenues for the Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF), which helps secure land for trails and parks.

The legislation will also put $6.5 billion toward addressing a maintenance backlog at national parks.
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“Permanent LWCF funding will help improve access to public lands, including providing important access for hunting and fishing opportunities, and will ensure the program remains an important contributor to a strong and growing outdoor recreation economy that will benefit state and local economies throughout our nation,” Sen. Joe Manchin (D-W.Va.), who was part of a bipartisan group that introduced the bill, said in a floor speech...

Read more here:
https://thehill.com/homenews/senate/502376-senate-passes-lands-conservation-bill?utm_source=1500+CWP+List+Daily+Clips+and+Updates&utm_campaign=70ff7a4691-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2020_06_18_11_12&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_4369a4e737-70ff7a4691-84222569

Wednesday, May 27, 2020

Wyoming: Back Country Horsemen fight conditions to add convenience to Sunlight campgrounds

PowellTribune.com - Full Article

Posted Tuesday, May 26, 2020 8:20 am
By Mark Davis

Just after lunch, dark clouds moved in overhead and a cold rain began to fall. The storm was expected, but the crew couldn’t see it approaching at Dead Indian Campground — far below the surrounding peaks. It wasn’t welcome, but the crew was undeterred.

The work marked the beginning of a new season of hard labor, mixed with laughs, for the Shoshone Chapter of the Back Country Horsemen of America. Members from across the Big Horn Basin and southern Montana come together several times a year to maintain trails and trailheads in the Shoshone National Forest. It’s an endless, all-volunteer effort to keep trails open and provide comfort and convenience to those who frequent facilities in northwest Wyoming’s mountains...

Read more here:
https://www.powelltribune.com/stories/back-country-horsemen-fight-conditions-to-add-convenience-to-sunlight-campgrounds,25526