Tuesday, August 21, 2018

American Trails and Equine Land Conservation Resource to Co-Host Trails Webinar

Lexington, KY – August 20, 2018 – American Trails and Equine Land Conservation Resource (ELCR) will co-host a panel webinar on August 23, 2018 at 1:00 pm Eastern Time entitled “How They Did It: Planning and Creating Equestrian Trails Through Organization”.

Why attend this webinar? Part of American Trails’ Advancing Trails Webinar Series, this presentation focuses on the value and process of organizing throughout the equine community. Horsemen and women will see what organizations around the country are accomplishing as they protect places for equine activities of all kinds, and how collaboration is critical to getting things done. Planners will understand their role in helping achieve equestrian community needs through planning and conservation. Landscape architects will gain a better understanding of recreational equestrian trails in different regions of the country and how sustainable trail planning, design and maintenance can be done within the context of community health, wellbeing and welfare.

After an introduction by ELCR Education Director, Denise O’Meara, PLA, the following panelists will present aspects of the organization process in their communities, including sustainable trail planning, design and building.

Mary Farr works diligently to protect open land and trails in her home community of St. John’s, Florida, most recently creating trails through the community’s newly formed chapter of Back Country Horsemen, First Coast. Mary has lived in three of the fastest growing counties in the United States: Jefferson Parish (county), LA; Wake/Chatham County, NC and St Johns County, FL, and has “seen growth done poorly and done well”.

With her degree in Urban Planning and Economics and work in economic development and marketing research in the agricultural sector, Mary and husband Charles have placed a conservation easement on their 44-acre Long Leaf pine forest/horse farm, “so it will stay natural in perpetuity.” Mary will speak about the Coalitions that have formed, helping her to work through the trails and land protection scenario in her community on a variety of fronts.

Lyndall Erb is the San Mateo County, California director and president of Bay Area Barns and Trails. Lyndall will talk about BABT’s activities assisting landowners and land managers with preservation and maintenance of publicly accessible barns, stables, pastures, staging areas, horse camps, and trails throughout Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, Napa, San Mateo, San Francisco, Santa Clara, Solano, and Sonoma Counties. BABT administers a grant program to assist local organizations with projects and activities that will help to protect equestrian activities, facilities and land.

Lyndall grew up in San Francisco and has been active in the horse community of the San Francisco Bay Area since moving back to California in 1994. She has served on the Board of several clubs and committees including Los Viajeros Riding Club; Equestrian Trail Riders Action Committee (ETRAC); and Coastside Horse Council. She served as Volunteer Coordinator for the Woodside-area Horse Owners Association (WHOA) and on the San Mateo County Confined Animal Technical Advisory Committee.

Mark Flint is a professional trail designer from Tucson Arizona, where he works as a part-time trails program coordinator for Pima County and has his own trail design business, Southwest Trail Solutions, which has designed trails in Vermont and Nevada as well as in many parts of Arizona. Mark is also a chief regional steward for the Arizona Trail Association. He will speak about the organizational process of the Association, the coalitions formed and work that has been accomplished, including specifics on trial design and maintenance in the somewhat unique conditions of the Arizona region and Arizona National Scenic Trail corridor.

Mark was heavily involved in the design and construction of the Arizona National Scenic Trail in Southern Arizona and did design and construction project management on segments in Central Arizona.

To register for the webinar, visit https://www.americantrails.org/training/how-they-did-it-advocacy-planning-and-creating-equestrian-trails-through-organization. The webinar is free, with a $15 fee for CEU credits for landscape architects and planners.

About the Equine Land Conservation Resource (ELCR): ELCR builds awareness of the loss of lands available for horse-related activities and facilitates the protection and conservation of those lands working to ensure America’s equine heritage lives on and the emotional, physical and economic benefits of the horse-human relationship remains accessible. ELCR serves as an information resource and clearinghouse on conserving horse properties, land use planning, land stewardship/best management practices, trails, liability and equine economic impact. For more information about the ELCR visit www.elcr.org or call (859) 455-8383

About American Trails: American Trails (AT) is a national, nonprofit organization working on behalf of all trail interests, including hiking, bicycling, mountain biking, horseback riding, water trails, snowshoeing, cross-country skiing, trail motorcycling, ATVs, snowmobiling and four-wheeling. AT supports local, regional, and long-distance trails and greenways, whether they be in backcountry, rural or urban areas by finding common ground and promoting cooperation among all trail interests. AT’s website, www.americantrails.org , is a comprehensive online source for planning, building, designing, funding, managing, enhancing, and supporting trails, greenways, and blueways. Contact AT at their Redding California office: (530) 605-4395.



For additional information, contact:
Denise O’Meara, Director of Education
Equine Land Conservation Resource
Phone: 859-455-8383 /Email: domeara@elcr.org
www.ELCR.org

Monday, August 20, 2018

Congress Must Act Now to Preserve the Land and Water Conservation Fund

Westword.com - Full Article

Paul Lopez | August 19, 2018 | 7:31am

For over half a century, Americans have enjoyed a program that contributes approximately $20 billion into protecting land in nearly every county in the U.S., helping to support more than 42,000 state and local park projects including playgrounds, trails and open spaces, and improving access to the great outdoors for all Americans — accomplished with no cost to taxpayers.

It almost sounds too good to be true, and unfortunately, it may not be true much longer unless Congress renews the Land and Water Conservation Fund before it expires on September 30. With it would go this country’s best promise to protect our public outdoor spaces and our cultural heritage...

Read more here:
https://www.westword.com/news/congress-must-preserve-the-land-and-water-conservation-fund-10677075

Monday, August 6, 2018

Hoofin’ It! Exploring: Washington State Parks by Horseback

Yelmonline.com - Full Article

July 26 2018

Does your horse yearn for a walk on the beach or trail?

Come to think of it, do you yearn to ride your horse on the beach or trail?

Most of Washington’s ocean beaches and several Washington state parks allow equestrian activities, including sections of State Parks’ long-distance trails. A handful of park concessionaires also rent horses and mules and offer guided rides.

So, saddle your steed, or book a guided ride and giddy-up!

THE ADVENTURE

Individual parks

♥ Bridle Trails State Park, east of Seattle, gives horses the right of way on 28 miles of trails. Social rides and equestrian events take place throughout the year at the park, allowing visitors and locals to mingle over a shared passion.

Set between Kirkland and Redmond, Bridle Trails is the place for city dwellers with horses.

With three arenas and a full calendar of equestrian events, you won’t have the park to yourself, but these activities, plus festivals and concerts, will keep you and your horse busy...

Read more here:
http://www.yelmonline.com/life/article_5cf40134-90f4-11e8-a8a3-df6145e09d1e.html

Sunday, August 5, 2018

Colorado: Valley needs a place for enjoyment of horses

AspenTimes.com - Full Article

August 1 2018
Karin Reid Offield

One of the arguments about the need for the historic Sutey Ranch for horseback riding is the fact that as Tony Vagneur wrote in a column in The Aspen Times not too long ago, that in our old days, when our grandfathers and mothers were young and Tony, too, we could ride from ranch to ranch, mountain to mountain and valley to valley without ever stepping into a horse trailer. For us, due to many reasons, that time is over. We cannot cross a road, we cannot access our trails, and we cannot even ride down along side of the roadways. We have to create areas carved out where we can enjoy our horses.

The mountain bikers are asking for the development of loop trails from Red Hill Bureau of Land Management area by expanding the Red Hill boundary to include the Sutey Ranch, likely allowing for a rideable connection all the way onto County Road 112, just a mile away from the Fisher Creek BLM area on Missouri Heights...

Read more here:
https://www.aspentimes.com/opinion/letters-to-the-editor/valley-needs-a-place-for-enjoyment-of-horses/

Monday, July 23, 2018

California: Marin County to appeal ruling on bike access to trail

Marinij.com - Full Article

By Richard Halstead, Marin Independent Journal
POSTED: 07/20/18, 5:13 PM PDT

Marin County will appeal a Marin Superior Court ruling that blocked the opening of a trail to bicyclists in the hills between Corte Madera and Mill Valley.

The Board of Supervisors announced the decision to appeal the decision after exiting a closed session on Tuesday.

The appeal is of an April ruling by Judge Paul Haakenson in favor of Community Venture Partners, a Mill Valley nonprofit, that challenged the county Open Space District’s plan to allow bicyclists on the Bob Middagh Trail — a narrow, single-track trail.

Work to prepare for the transition — widening of the trail from 3 feet to 5 feet, reducing its grade, installing textured rolling dips and armored drainages — was completed last fall. The 3,461-foot trail was scheduled to reopen as a multi-use trail as soon as the winter rains ended. Instead, it has remained closed to bikes...

Read more here:
http://www.marinij.com/article/NO/20180720/NEWS/180729963

Wednesday, July 18, 2018

Horseback riding quartet blazes Olympic Discovery Trail

PTLeader.com - Full Article

Kirk Boxleitner kboxleitner@ptleader.com
Jul 11, 2018

A quartet of equestriennes got together to blaze a trail, so to speak, by riding from Port Townsend to Lake Crescent on the existing Olympic Discovery Trail.

“To my knowledge, we were the first horseback riders to do so,” Port Townsend resident Summer Martell said, after she and three of her girlfriends completed the ride from June 23 to June 27, beating her expected travel time of a week for the ride.

Martell explained she and her fellow local riders wanted to have “a fun adventure, while bringing goodwill” from one end of the Olympic Discovery Trail to the other.

“We wanted to promote and support not only the Olympic Discovery Trail, but all multi-use trails that include equestrians,” Martell said...

Read more here:
http://www.ptleader.com/news/horseback-riding-quartet-blazes-olympic-discovery-trail/article_7bdc3620-8488-11e8-ad9c-eb628f83c931.html

Friday, July 6, 2018

3 Easy Ways to Keep Horse Trails Open

Trailmeister.com - Full Article

July 2 2018
by Robert Eversole

Keeping Your Trails Open

As published in the July, 2018 issue of The Northwest Horse Source

We’re blessed. Our nation’s public lands are one of the America’s greatest achievements. Every year millions of horse owners across the U.S. visit our federal, state and local parks and other open spaces.

And nearly every visit has something in common—trails. Horse owners experience our public lands on trails—whether riding on short paths to scenic overlooks, or taking backcountry wilderness pack trips. Horse trails are such a repetitive theme woven through open lands that they can often be taken for granted. Please don’t.

Have you wondered how you can do more for your trails, even when off the trail? Here are three easy ways to help keep the trails you love open to horse use now and into the future...

Read more here:
https://www.trailmeister.com/3-easy-ways-to-keep-horse-trails-open/