Thursday, September 12, 2019

NY State spends millions on Frontier Town, but horse riders don’t like it

NewYorkUpstate.com - Full Article

Updated Sep 11, 5:11 PM; Posted Sep 11, 6:04 AM

By David Figura | dfigura@nyup.com

NORTH HUDSON, N.Y. -- Frontier Town, the state’s newest Adirondack campground, opened June 28 with promises to be a “unique, world-class” facility for traditional tent campers, RVers and equestrian campers alike.

So far tent campers and RVers have embraced Frontier Town. Horse riders not so much.

“It’s a lovely facility, but it’s just not well-designed for horse campers,” said Dan Gruen, trails council chairman for the New York State Horse Council, who visited the campground when it was finished and said he has spoken to more than dozen campers who’ve been there since.

“I like the idea of creating a place where riders can come and have a nice camping facility and be safe with their horses. That’s all wonderful,” he said. “I don’t think Frontier Town as it is now is that place.”

The new Frontier Town campground sits on 91 acres owned the town of North Hudson and Essex County near the site of former Frontier Town amusement park, which closed in 1999. The campground is located a short distance off exit 27 on Interstate 87 (the Adirondack Northway), at the foothills of the Eastern High Peaks.

The state to date has spent $19.3 million on the entire project. It features 45 tent camping sites, including three group-camping sites; 13 RV and trailer campsites and 33 equestrian campsites. In addition, there are about four miles of trails for horse riders...

Read more here:
https://www.newyorkupstate.com/adirondacks/2019/09/state-spends-millions-on-frontier-town-but-horse-riders-dont-like-it.html

Wednesday, September 11, 2019

California: Woodside Planning Commission denies permit for equestrian bridge

AlmanacNews.com - Full Article

Uploaded: Mon, Sep 9, 2019, 10:43 am
by Rick Radin / Almanac

The Woodside Planning Commission gave a nudge to town traditions on Sept. 4 by denying a request for a conditional use permit for a plan to spend $200,000 in town and donated money to replace a washed-out equestrian bridge.

The commission's vote was 3-3, according to Planning Director Jackie Young. Commissioners Sani Elfishawy, Aydan Kutay and William Fender voted against approving the use permit, while Marilyn Voelke, Kurt Calia and Craig London voted in favor of it. Jim Bildner was absent.

The reason behind the three no votes on the plan: The bridge, over Bear Creek Gulch, only benefited horseback riders and not the community as a whole, Young said...

Read more here:
https://www.almanacnews.com/news/2019/09/09/woodside-planning-commission-declines-permit-for-equestrian-bridge

A Vast Liquidation of Public Lands Is Underway in Alaska

AmericanProgress.org

By Jenny Rowland-Shea, Sung Chung, Sally Hardin, Matt Lee-Ashley, and Kate Kelly
Posted on September 10, 2019, 6:00 am

The Trump administration is quietly leading one of the largest liquidations of America’s public lands since the late 19th century. If fully implemented, this effort could result in the transfer, sale, or private exploitation of more than 28.3 million acres of public lands in Alaska, including old-growth forests, subsistence hunting areas for Alaska Native communities, habitats for polar bears, salmon spawning streams, and other backcountry areas.1 It would affect millions of acres in the Tongass National Forest and the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge alone...

Read more here:
https://www.americanprogress.org/issues/green/reports/2019/09/10/474256/vast-liquidation-public-lands-underway-alaska/?utm_source=1500+CWP+List+Daily+Clips+and+Updates&utm_campaign=bb02ff347d-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2019_09_10_05_46&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_4369a4e737-bb02ff347d-84222569

Sunday, September 8, 2019

California Nonprofit celebrates 30 years of advocating for trails

Sandiegouniontribune.com - Full Article

By JULIE GALLANT
SEP. 6, 2019 11 AM
Ramona Trails Association (RTA) members rode down trails on horses and a buggy at Los Vaqueros Group Horse Camp in Cuyamaca Rancho State Park Labor Day Weekend to celebrate the association’s 30th anniversary this year.

The occasion marks three decades since RTA’s incorporation as a nonprofit in 1989, completed with the help of retired attorney Jeremiah Reid and his wife, Katie. The group had only a handful of members when it originated but has since grown to a current membership of about 75 trails enthusiasts.

RTA’s mission is to retain access to and help maintain existing multi-use trails in rural areas as well as actively encourage new trail development on public and private lands in the greater Ramona area. In the process, it works closely with federal, state and local government agencies and other volunteer organizations...

Read more here:
https://www.sandiegouniontribune.com/ramona-sentinel/lifestyle/story/2019-09-05/nonprofit-celebrates-30-years-of-advocating-for-trails

Saturday, September 7, 2019

Report: 6 million acres of state lands in West inaccessible

APNews.com - Full Article

By MATTHEW BROWN
August 19, 2019

BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — More than 6 million acres (2.5 million hectares) of state property scattered across 11 states in the U.S. West are landlocked by private property and largely inaccessible to hunters, anglers and other recreational users, public lands advocates said Monday.

The Theodore Roosevelt Conservation Partnership and onX, a Montana-based land data company, analyzed land ownership patterns for a report detailing the extent of state-owned parcels that lack public access.

Montana, Arizona, New Mexico and Wyoming each have more than 1 million acres (0.4 million hectares) of state lands surrounded by private property, according to the report...

Read more here:
https://www.apnews.com/fc9f3b925f6c490f8d0be8adc11c200e

Friday, September 6, 2019

Florida: After two decades, Martin County tries to resolve dispute over Palm City horseback trails

Tcpalm.com - Full Article

Joshua Solomon, Treasure Coast Newspapers
Published 6:22 p.m. ET Aug. 26, 2019

PALM CITY FARMS — One after the other, members of the Campbell family pleaded with county commissioners not to take away their property as it’s been known for nearly the last century. Tensions began to escalate. By the time Sharon Campbell spoke, the emotions piqued.

“The pressure that’s been applied to us has been like a terrorist tactic,” the co-owner of Just-E-Nuf Acres horse farm told the Martin County Commission earlier this month.

Commission Chairman Ed Ciampi said the issue has been “lingering, if not festering for decades.”

Tuesday, the issue of 20 years — with a history going back 100 — is to come to a crossroads...

Read more at:
https://www.tcpalm.com/story/news/local/shaping-our-future/growth/2019/08/26/palm-city-farms-trails-may-get-access-horeseback-trails/2088172001/

Thursday, September 5, 2019

Colorado: Who has the right of way? User etiquette, hierarchy on Snowmass-area trails

Aspentimes.com - Full Article

Snowmass | September 4, 2019

Town of Snowmass Parks, Recreation and Trails Department
Starr Jamison

Our trail development in Snowmass Village is rapidly changing as we build new trails and make new connections. How lucky are we to have the opportunity to separate use on trails within our small community, giving everyone a unique experience.

In the village, hikers and equestrians have their own trails, like Tom Blake and North Mesa equestrian and hiking trails. Aspen Skiing Co. maintains Vista, Rabbit Run and Sierra Club for hikers only. All of these trails prohibit mountain bike use. The Town helps the U.S. Forest Service maintain the Ditch Trail, which allows users to access miles of hiking- and equestrian-only trails in the Maroon Bells Wilderness Area.

On Snowmass Ski Area we built the Discovery Trail, a single direction beginner uphill only mountain biking trail, and Skico continues to provide miles of downhill-only trails for mountain bikers. Most communities do not have the luxury to provide such diversity in their trails systems as we have here in Snowmass Village.

Even with the separation and diversity, we are still faced with the problem that most trail users want peace and solitude on the trail. The reality is population will continue to grow and every user will eventually see others on the trails.

When we share the trails, who has the right of way? The first thing you need to know is there is a hierarchy on the trail. You may have seen the yellow trail etiquette triangle with a horse, hiker and biker. Horses have priority, followed by hikers, and then bikers. It’s pretty simple to remember and makes encounters much more pleasant when everyone knows who gets to go first...

Read more at:
https://www.aspentimes.com/snowmass/who-has-the-right-of-way-user-etiquette-hierarchy-on-snowmass-area-trails/